Platanos Maduros

sweet-or-savory

Platanos maduros are caramelized and crispy on the outside with soft, sweet, and gooey centers.  Plantains, a tropical starchy member of the banana family, can be enjoyed sweet or savory. Platanos maduros which translates to ripe plantains are made from totally tender black plantains. In their very ripe and green form, plantains yield savory and crunchy treats with a hint of sweetness called mariquitas (plantain chips) or tostones.

plantainsvery-ripe-plantainsthinly-sliced-plantains

Very ripe plantains yield a sweet delicacy called platanos maduros (sweet fried plantains) that caramelize in the hot frying pan and melt in your mouth. I like to let my platanos maduros get extra crispy and nearly burnt. These tiny pieces of crunchy delights almost melt away like sweet chicarrones when done right. Platanos maduros are a celebrated dietary staple and can pretty much accompany any Cuban meal especially picadillo. While tostones might be a reigning favorite, platanos maduros offer a balancing sweetness to rich and salty Cuban dishes.

beautiful-platanos

Platanos Maduros

  • 2 extremely ripe plantains
  • Vegetable oil
  • Sea salt
  • Lime wedges (optional)

Heat the oil. I placed the heat between 5-6- make sure you wait until the oil is hot. You usually want to use about an inch of oil or so. I like to use less oil or sometimes I quickly sear the outsides of the plantains and then bake them at 350 for 20 minutes with a sprinkle of brown sugar to be somewhat healthier. When the oil is hot fry the sliced sweet plantains on both sides until a golden deep rich brown color with crispy edges emerges.

fry-the-plantainsplatanos-maduros-golden-brown

Place the plantanos maduros on paper towels to drain off the excess oil when finished. Obviously they taste majestic and glorious when sitting in the oil but for my arteries’ sake I drain them. I like to sprinkle a little salt on the paper towel so they don’t stick and so the salt melts into these sweet treats.

plantains-vs-tostones

The platanos maduros will be initially quite hot with crispy gooey exteriors but lava-like centers. Once they do not cling to the paper towel, I know they are ready to eat. Gently use a spoon to see if they will give enough to pull without tearing. Lime is not necessarily a traditional addition, but usually when you eat platanos maduros with picadillo or palomilla the lime used will get on them and taste amazing. A little squeeze of lime only amplifies their flavor.

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